Monday, 10 June 2019

Art Quarterly

Throughout 2018 I was talking with the Art Fund about donating a small collection of work by Dave Pearson to a museum or art gallery. The series of drawings were being gifted by a collector who wished to remain anonymous. They were from a series of beautiful graphite drawings that Dave called 'In The Seven Woods', and they were inspired by the Abbots Bromley Horn Dance. Here's a selection of the work:




Eventually the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL), based at Reading University, accepted the gift, and they are now on display there. 

Today I found a package sent to me from the Art Fund that included a copy of the Art Quarterly which contained this short piece on the gift: 



It's good to see Dave's work getting publicity in this way, and interesting that these pieces have ended up in a collection dedicated to the 'life and traditions of the English countryside' which Dave immersed himself in the mid-1970s and 80s when he produced his "Calendar Customs' and 'In The Seven Woods' series.

Tuesday, 30 April 2019

Dave Pearson's self-portraits





The critic Edward Lucie-Smith wrote in one of his essays about Dave Pearson's work -

"(his)...own series of self-images exceeds both Van Gogh and Rembrandt in terms of number. They show a huge range of stylistic flexibility, with each change of style reflecting a change of mood."



When the Dave Pearson Trust existed it took the decision to limit the number of self-portraits sold, in part because the family were uncertain as to which they were prepared to sell. More recently we've held a small exhibition of self-portraits at the Studio, and not surprisingly there is growing interest among collectors in these pieces.




There are over 120 self-portraits in the catalogue of Dave's work, and it would be interesting to look more closely at these and see what are the main stylistic variations. Then to see how they reflect and portray the mood of the artist, as suggested by Lucie-Smith.  

Saturday, 13 April 2019

Easter 2019 Open Days




We had a very enjoyable opening of the studio on Friday evening and Saturday afternoon. Just about all our visitors stayed for longer than an hour, and it was good to talk about Dave Pearson's work with other local artists, a handful of ladies from Apna (who share our building), and various friends - some of whom had travelled to Haslingden from Shropshire. 

We made a few sales on Saturday and also met with Sara Riccardi, an Italian art historian who has recently moved to Rawtenstall and has already made an impact by starting a series of talks on women artists. Sara runs Artcross (www.artcross.co.uk):


We also took ownership of a stunning triptych which had been in private hands. It's unusual in being of a size which makes it possible to hang in a domestic setting. Most of Dave's triptychs are too large for other than gallery walls. Please contact us if you want to view:



Friday, 8 March 2019

Two showlets in the pipeline


The According to McGee gallery in York have asked us to show alongside Harry Malkin in an exhibition due to open on Saturday 6th April. We've chosen a selection of small canvases that Dave painted in the late 1990s and which demonstrate many of the traits of his Byzantium work (example above).

At the same time we're revamping the display at the studio 54 Manchester Road in Haslingden, to show a range of Dave's work that has been framed, and is ready for sale. We'll be choosing a day or two during the Easter period to open the building for anyone interested in dropping by. Details soon...



Monday, 14 January 2019

Van Gogh's 'Bedroom'

In the process of tidying up my office I just came across some old photos of Dave's. They were mostly from the late 1960s, about the time I first met him. It's when he was in the middle of a period of work which was totally dominated by Vincent Van Gogh. He worked in all mediums, but the biggest and most impressive pieces were large paper-mache reconstructions of some of Van Gogh's painting. Nearly all of Dave's work from this period has gone - either fallen apart or broken up to make space for later pieces. 


Van Gogh's 'Bedroom'. Dave built this slightly larger than life size. It was exhibited, I think at Liverpool's Bluecoat Gallery, along with other pieces from this period. Interestingly its mentioned (and illustrated) in Thames and Hudson's 'Environments and Happenings' by Adrian Henri, published in 1974. It says..."David Pearson. an obsessional artist from Lancashire, has emerged as one of the most exciting new artists in a series of recent shows. His work is almost entirely motivated by the life and work of Van Gogh...".

Tuesday, 1 January 2019

New Year - and a Sale!

The On-line Shop (see previous posts), offering a selection of smaller works by Dave Pearson has been a success - selling considerably more work in the pre-Christmas period than we had expected. 

But one surprise was that the prints - the etchings and drypoints that make up two of the seven categories on sale - didn't sell better than they did. I hoped that they would do well on-line, in part because they can be viewed quite well on a screen. This is in contrast to the paintings where, inevitably, the details of the brushwork get lost. Below are details of four example prints:


Admittedly they have to be sold at a price that covers the printing costs, because unlike the other work which is simply in storage at the studio, we have to ask the master printer Alan Birch to create new editions for us, and cover his costs. 

So we're trying out a new idea - which is to join the January sales, and reduce the price of each print by £100! It will be interesting to see if this results in selling some of these wonderful artworks. They are all in verified limited editions, and once sold this won't be repeated.

The Calendar Customs series of etchings are particularly amazing, full of detail from Dave's exhaustive researches into English customs. They are very attractive and absolutely crammed with minute detail: 




The Dave Pearson On-line Shop website is at www.dspearsonshop.co.uk